Archive for the ‘privacy’ Category

Land of the Free Watch: The Creation of a Border Security State

aa-checkpoint Our borders have, conveniently enough, long been Constitution-free zones where more or less anything goes, including warrantless searches of various sorts. In the twenty-first century, however, the border itself, north as well as south, has not only been increasingly up-armored, but redefined as a 100-mile-wide strip around the United States (and Alaska). In other words – check that map again – our “borders” now cover an expanse in which nearly 200 million Americans, or two-thirds of the U.S. population, live. Included are nine of the 10 largest metropolitan areas. If you live in Florida, Maine, or Michigan, for example, no matter how far inland you may be, you are “on the border.” Imagine that. And then imagine what it means. U.S. Customs and Border Protection, as Todd Miller points out today, is not only the largest law enforcement agency in the country you know next to nothing about, but the largest, flat and simple. Now, its agents can act as if the Constitution has been put to bed up to 100 miles inland anywhere. This, in turn, means – as the ACLU has written – that at new checkpoints and elsewhere in areas no American would once have considered borderlands, you can be stopped, interrogated, and searched “on an everyday basis with absolutely no suspicion of wrongdoing.” http://original.antiwar.com/engelhardt/2014/04/22/the-creation-of-a-border-security-state/


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This is What Drones Can See

aa-drone - 3-8-14 Welcome to the new world of no privacy. https://www.youtube.com/v/AHrZgS-Gvi4


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Invasion of the Data Snatchers

aa-surveillance - very good one Estimates vary, but by 2020 there could be over 30 billion devices connected to the Internet. Once dumb, they will have smartened up thanks to sensors and other technologies embedded in them and, thanks to your machines, your life will quite literally have gone online. The implications are revolutionary. Your smart refrigerator will keep an inventory of food items, noting when they go bad. Your smart thermostat will learn your habits and adjust the temperature to your liking. Smart lights will illuminate dangerous parking garages, even as they keep an “eye” out for suspicious activity. Techno-evangelists have a nice catchphrase for this future utopia of machines and the never-ending stream of information, known as Big Data, it produces: the Internet of Things. So abstract. So inoffensive. Ultimately, so meaningless. A future Internet of Things does have the potential to offer real benefits, but the dark side of that seemingly shiny coin is this: companies will increasingly know all there is to know about you. http://www.tomdispatch.com/post/175822/tomgram%3A_crump_and_harwood%2C_the_net_closes_around_us/


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Freedom for Me, But Not for Thee

aa-Diane Feinstein Diane Feinstein’s outrage was directed at CIA domestic spying for the wrong reasons. She not only expressed no outrage over NSA spying, including upon her 37 million California constituents, but she approved it. The CIA behavior that she condemns is the unapproved or unreported torture and the domestic spying on a dozen persons in another branch of government. The NSA behavior that she approves is spying on all Americans all the time. All of this behavior goes to the heart of personal liberty in a free society. At that heart is the principle of personal sovereignty – the idea that individuals are sovereign and the state is merely one instrument with which to protect that sovereignty. Yet the government of which Feinstein approves has been assaulting personal sovereignty by destroying personal privacy. Privacy is not only a natural right – it exists by virtue of our humanity – but it has sound historical and textual roots. A natural right is an area or zone of personal behavior that may not be interfered with by the government, no matter whose good that interference might serve. http://original.antiwar.com/andrew-p-napolitano/2014/03/19/freedom-for-me-but-not-for-thee/#.Uyr5hdbj56k.email


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Paul Wins CPAC Poll, Says Privacy is the Issue for Republicans

aa-Rand Paul - speaking at 2014 CPAC The day after he won the Conservative Political Action Conference straw poll of potential GOP presidential candidates, with a 3-1 lead over his nearest rival, Kentucky Senator Rand Paul (shown) said a clear focus on the issue of privacy in the midst of America’s growing surveillance state is necessary if the Republican Party is going to grow and win elections again. http://www.thenewamerican.com/usnews/politics/item/17806-paul-wins-straw-poll-says-privacy-is-the-issue-for-republicans


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How the Repo Industry is Collecting Data on Virtually Every Car in America

aa-surveillance - scanner used by repo industry Few notice the “spotter car” from Manny Sousa’s repo company as it scours Massachusetts parking lots, looking for vehicles whose owners have defaulted on their loans. Sousa’s unmarked car is part of a technological revolution that goes well beyond the repossession business, transforming any ­industry that wants to check on the whereabouts of ordinary people. An automated reader attached to the spotter car takes a picture of every license plate it passes and sends it to a company in Texas that already has more than 1.8 billion plate scans from vehicles across the country. These scans mean big money for Sousa — typically $200 to $400 every time the spotter finds a vehicle that’s stolen or in default — so he runs his spotter around the clock, typically adding 8,000 plate scans to the database in Texas each day. “Honestly, we’ve found random apartment complexes and shopping ­plazas that are sweet spots” where the company can impound multiple vehicles, explains Sousa, the president of New England Associates Inc. in Bridgewater. But the most significant impact of Sousa’s business is far bigger than locating cars whose owners have defaulted on loans: It is the growing database of snapshots showing where Americans were at specific times, information that everyone from private detectives to ­insurers are willing to pay for. While public debate about the license reading technology has centered on how police should use it, business has eagerly adopted the $10,000 to $17,000 scanners with remarkably few limits. http://www.silverdoctors.com/how-the-repo-industry-is-collecting-data-on-virtually-every-car-in-america/


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New Assaults on American Law

aa-NSA - your tax dollars at work In the months since Edward Snowden revealed the nature and extent of the spying that the National Security Agency (NSA) has been perpetrating upon Americans and foreigners, some of the NSA’s most troublesome behavior has not been a part of the public debate. This behavior constitutes the government’s assaults on the American legal system. Those assaults have been conducted thus far on two fronts, one of which is aimed at lawyers who represent foreign entities here in America, and the other is aimed at lawyers who represent criminal defendants against whom evidence has been obtained unlawfully and presented in court untruthfully. http://original.antiwar.com/andrew-p-napolitano/2014/02/26/new-assaults-on-american-law/#.Uw9CFjFieTY.email


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Land of the Free Watch: Oregon Police Give Nightclubs ID Scanners to Datamine Customers

aa-scanner For the last several weeks, police have issued ID-scanning devices to clubs and bars all throughout Portland’s Old Town neighborhood. The scanners not only captured customers’ personal data, including names and photos, but uploaded all the information to a police database. http://www.infowars.com/oregon-police-give-nightclubs-id-scanners-to-datamine-customers/


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The Art of American Scaremongering

aa-America - US of paranoia What we are seeing is a consensus within both the administration and congress that leakers of any and all classified information must somehow be punished. Working back from that premise, it is necessary to find some legal justification to enable the punishment to take place. This is behavior not atypical of totalitarian regimes. The Soviets maintained meticulous records of their completely phony show trials to demonstrate that some kind of rule of law was taking place while even the Nazis used a famous jurist Carl Schmitt to propagate their “Fuhrer principle,” that the government is always right. Rogers and others in the government who are looking to imprison people for doing the job that they should have been doing in terms of protecting the constitution are heirs to that legacy of government through intimidation and fear mongering. http://original.antiwar.com/giraldi/2014/02/10/the-art-of-american-scaremongering/


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Totalitarian Paranoia in the Post-Orwellian Surveillance State

aa-surveillance - very good one Orwell was clear that the right to privacy had come under egregious assault. But the right to privacy pointed to something more sinister than the violation of individual rights. When ruthlessly transgressed, the issue of privacy became a moral and political principle by which to assess the nature, power and severity of an emerging totalitarian state. As important as Orwell’s warning was in shedding light on the horrors of mid-20th century totalitarianism and the endless regimes of state spying imposed on citizens, the text serves as a brilliant but limited metaphor for mapping the expansive trajectory of global surveillance and authoritarianism now characteristic of the first decades of the new millennium. http://truth-out.org/opinion/item/21656-totalitarian-paranoia-in-the-post-orwellian-surveillance-state#.Uvo-KFcI-9U.email


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Get Ready: The Day We Fight Back Against Mass Surveillance is Coming

aa-surveillance - we can stop spying Two years ago, major websites like Google, Reddit and Wikipedia went dark for a day. They were protesting the then-pending “Stop Online Piracy Act,” federal legislation that would have done enormous damage to the open internet by creating system of censorship and deterring digital-media innovators. The 18 January 2012 blackout created an outpouring of opposition from average Americans who suddenly realized what was at stake, and Congress backed off a bill that almost certainly would have passed otherwise. There won’t be a website blackout next Tuesday, 11 February, but there will be another virtual call to arms. In the U.S. the primary goal this time is to help reverse America’s retreat from liberty by telling lawmakers we can’t abide a surveillance state – and by insisting they vote for a measure, called the USA Freedom Act, that would begin to restore the civil liberties we’ve lost in recent times. (For people outside the U.S. the goal will be similar, to push authorities toward policies favoring liberty and privacy.) http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/feb/06/nsa-fighting-back-against-surveillence-state


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Corporate Billionaires Defend NSA

aa-movie - They Live - obey The government’s defense of its constant surveillance of the American public reached a new level of absurdity when Obama compared Paul Revere to the NSA. Now it’s time for the corporate billionaires to defend what their puppet Obama can’t. http://www.infowars.com/billionaire-ceos-defend-nsa/


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It’s About Blackmail, Not National Security

aa-surveillance state - great parody As it happens, Edward Snowden’s revelations fit the logic of the system the NSA created to a T. What the former agency contractor revealed, above all, was that the surveillance of anyone and everyone was the essence of our new world, and that not even the NSA would be exempt. He made that agency his own object of surveillance and so opened it up to the scrutiny of the rest of the planet. He gave its officials a dose of their own medicine. Much of the ensuing outrage from the U.S. intelligence community, including the calls for his head, the cries of “treason,” the demands to bring him to “justice,” and so on, reflect outrage over the fact that the agency had gotten a full-scale dose of its own rules. It turns out that you don’t have to be an ordinary citizen or a world leader to feel terrible when someone appropriates the right to surveil your life. When it happened to agency honchos, they undoubtedly felt just like Merkel or Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff or so many other figures who discovered that their lives and communications weren’t private and weren’t their own. In a perfectly human manner, reality being far too ugly for their taste, they wanted payback. http://www.tomdispatch.com/post/175795/tomgram%3A_alfred_mccoy%2C_it%27s_about_blackmail%2C_not_national_security/


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NSA’s Preference for Metadata

aa-NSA - prism The hidden ball in the debate over the NSA’s collection of phone and e-mail metadata (vs. tapping into actual conversations with a court order) is that the NSA actually prefers the metadata approach because it strips away privacy more efficiently, says ex-NSA analyst Kirk Wiebe. http://original.antiwar.com/Kirk-Wiebe/2014/01/13/nsas-preference-for-metadata/


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You Can’t Opt Out

aa-NSA - very good one The debate Edward Snowden envisioned when he revealed the extent of National Security Agency (NSA) spying on Americans has taken a bad turn. Instead of a careful examination of what the NSA does, the legality of its actions, what risks it takes for what gains, and how effective the agency has been in its stated mission of protecting Americans, we increasingly have government officials or retired versions of the same demanding — quite literally — Snowden’s head and engaging in the usual fear-mongering over 9/11. They have been aided by a chorus of pundits, columnists, and present as well as former officials offering bumper-sticker slogans like “If you have nothing to hide, you have nothing to fear,” all the while claiming our freedom is in direct conflict with our security. It’s time to face these arguments directly. So here are ten myths about NSA surveillance that need debunking. Let’s sort them out. http://www.tomdispatch.com/post/175792/tomgram%3A_peter_van_buren%2C_we_have_to_destroy_our_constitution_to_save_it/


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More DHS-Funded Police Surveillance Cameras; No Drop in Crime

aa-surveillance - cameras on city street Thousands of surveillance cameras are showing up in cities across the country without a corresponding reduction in crime. Citizens are taking notice of this fact of the federal takeover of local police, and they are speaking out. http://thenewamerican.com/usnews/crime/item/17378-more-dhs-funded-police-surveillance-cameras-no-drop-in-crime


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The Pipe Dream of NSA Reformers

aa-NSA - your tax dollars at work The pipe dream of many of those who are complaining about the NSA’s massive surveillance scheme is that the NSA can be “reined in” by some type of congressional legislation. They just don’t get it. As long as the NSA exists, it’s going to do whatever it needs to do to protect “national security,” even if that means breaking the law. After all, protecting “national security” is paramount. It is everything. Does anyone honestly believe that the NSA is going to let the country go down if breaking the law enables the NSA to save it? Haven’t these people ever heard the old adage, “The Constitution is not a suicide pact”? Equally important, every single NSA official knows that nothing is ever going to happen to him if he is caught breaking the law, so long as he is doing it to protect “national security.” http://fff.org/2014/01/10/the-pipe-dream-of-nsa-reformers/


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American Privacy is Vanishing as the Government and Corporations Raid Our Online Lives

aa-online spying Was 2013 the year online privacy died? Or was it the year that people paying attention realized that their online lives—and all their data and communications—was low-hanging fruit that was being picked and parsed by big government and big business. http://www.alternet.org/civil-liberties/government-and-business-raid-online-lives


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Those Who Sacrifice Liberty for Facebook

aa-1984 - freedumbville great one We pay for convenience by willfully giving up privacy. Smartphones basically act like global tracking devices in your pocket. Every email sent is sucked up and recorded somewhere on a government server. Bank-account numbers are thrown up on the Internet, only to be occasionally stolen by slick hackers. Social media might as well be a portal for telling employers, “Never hire me, ever.” Like welfare, the average person has opted for short-term benefits at the expense of his own freedom. If that decision were limited to just the individual, everything would be kosher. But under democracy, every brain-dead bottom-feeder has a shot at electing steal-and-redistribute pols. They don’t just vote away their own liberty; they surrender everyone’s for a taste of tax handouts. http://takimag.com/article/those_who_sacrifice_liberty_for_facebook_james_miller/print#axzz2q195EmLm


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Morality Versus the National Security State

aa-America - US of paranoia Why should the government be involved in immoral or illegal activity? Yet, isn’t immoral and illegal activity the very essence of the national-security state apparatus that has now become a permanent part of America’s governmental structure, especially since much of what it does is conducted in secret? Consider the Edward Snowden revelations of a massive super-secret surveillance scheme by the U.S. national-security state on the entire American populace, not to mention millions of people all over the world. Where do they get the constitutional authorization for that? Is there a constitutional provision that empowers them to do that? No! The only justification is the same one that the national-security state has always cited for its exercise of secret, covert operations: “national security,” a term that isn’t even found in the Constitution and has no objective meaning. Why shouldn’t the American people decide whether they want to be spied on in this way? Isn’t the citizenry supposed to be the ones in control? Aren’t federal officials supposed to be mere servants, with the citizenry as their bosses? http://fff.org/2014/01/09/morality-versus-the-national-security-state/


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Spying on Congress

aa-NSA - logo Last week, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., wrote to Gen. Keith Alexander, director of the National Security Administration (NSA), and asked plainly whether the NSA has been or is now spying on members of Congress or other public officials. The senator’s letter was no doubt prompted by the revelations of Edward Snowden to the effect that the federal government’s lust for personal private data about all Americans and many foreigners knows no bounds, and its respect for the constitutionally protected and statutorily enforced right to privacy is nonexistent The senator’s benign and neutral letter came on the heels of a suggestion by his colleague Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., to the effect that Alexander’s boss, Gen. James Clapper, director of national intelligence, perjured himself before a Senate subcommittee when he testified that the NSA is not gathering massive amounts of data from tens or hundreds of millions of Americans. Alexander himself is also on the hook for having testified in a highly misleading manner to a House committee when he was asked whether the NSA has the ability to read emails and listen to phone calls and he stated: “No, we don’t have that authority. Thus far, Paul is the only member of Congress possessed of the personal courage to call out Clapper by arguing that working for the government is no defense to lying under oath. The gravity of Paul’s charges was enhanced by revelations subsequent to the Clapper testimony to the effect that Clapper was told in advance of his testimony what questions would be put to him and then declined an offer afterward to correct any misstatements. In a new low for members of Congress, the NSA’s own advocate in the House, Long Island’s Rep. Peter King, R-N.Y., attacked Paul for attacking Clapper for lying under oath. The King argument is: Anything goes when it comes to national security – even lying under oath, even violating everyone’s constitutional rights, even destroying the freedom you have sworn to protect. http://original.antiwar.com/andrew-p-napolitano/2014/01/08/spying-on-congress/#.Us6shMdKj4g.email


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Life in the Electronic Concentration Camp

aa-surveillance state - great parody To put it bluntly, we are living in an electronic concentration camp. Through a series of imperceptible steps, we have willingly allowed ourselves to become enmeshed in a system that knows the most intimate details of our lives, analyzes them, and treats us accordingly. As George Orwell warned, “You had to live—did live, from habit that became instinct—in the assumption that every sound you made was overheard, and, except in darkness, every movement scrutinized.” Thus, we have arrived in Orwell’s world. http://www.lewrockwell.com/2014/01/john-w-whitehead/life-in-the-electronic-concentration-camp/


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Clues to Future Snowden Leaks Found in His Past

Edward Snowden Only a tiny fraction of Snowden’s documents have been published. What’s still to come? We believe one hint comes from Snowden’s past as a security specialist at one of one the NSA’s covert facilities at the University of Maryland. http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2014/01/clues-future-snowden-leaks-found-past.html


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Land of the Free Watch: Ex-NSA Boss: Fourth Amendment Dispensable in Post 9/11 World

aa-NSA - satirical logo The former boss of the CIA and the NSA, retired Gen. Michael Hayden, tells USA Today the Constitution and the Bill of Rights impede the smooth functioning of a Stasi police state. He said the NSA should not be required to seek court warrants in its widespread surveillance. http://www.infowars.com/ex-nsa-boss-fourth-amendment-dispensable-in-post-911-world/


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Fusion Centers: Expensive and Dangerous to Our Liberty

aa-fusion center Amidst unprecedented focus on overreach at the National Security Agency (NSA), many Americans have come to understand the risk of being spied on by the government in their electronic communications. But the intelligence-sharing hubs coordinated between DHS and state and local police departments around the country, called “fusion centers,” show there is extensive surveillance of Americans’ physical and social activities as well. http://reason.com/archives/2013/12/25/fusion-centers-expensive-and-dangerous-t


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NSA’s Goal is Elimination of Individual Privacy Worldwide

aa-surveillance state - homeland security means no privacy The NSA’s ultimate goal is to destroy individual privacy worldwide, working with its UK sidekick GCHQ, journalist Glenn Greenwald warned an EU inquiry, adding that they were far ahead of their rivals in their “ability to destroy privacy.” Greenwald, the former Guardian journalist renowned for publishing Edward Snowden’s leaks, criticized EU governments’ muted response to the revelations about the NSA’s mass espionage. Most governments reacted with “apathy and indifference” to reports that ordinary citizens were being spied upon, Greenwald said, pointing out that EU politicians only took action when they discovered that they themselves were being targeted. “I think Western governments have inculcated people to accept that privacy does not really have much value,” said Greenwald, adding it was “to get populations accustomed to violations of their privacy.” http://www.lewrockwell.com/2013/12/russia-today/the-nsas-goal/


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Snowden Writes Open Letter to the People of Brazil

aa-Edward Snowden - good poster
4.Six months ago, I stepped out from the shadows of the United States Government’s National Security Agency to stand in front of a journalist’s camera. I shared with the world evidence proving some governments are building a world-wide surveillance system to secretly track how we live, who we talk to, and what we say. I went in front of that camera with open eyes, knowing that the decision would cost me family and my home, and would risk my life. I was motivated by a belief that the citizens of the world deserve to understand the system in which they live. My greatest fear was that no one would listen to my warning. Never have I been so glad to have been so wrong. The reaction in certain countries has been particularly inspiring to me, and Brazil is certainly one of those. http://pastebin.com/2ybz27UE


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Logo of New NRO Spy Satellite: An Octopus Engulfing the World With the Words ‘Nothing is Beyond Our Reach’

aa-NRO - spy satellite logo On December 5th, The National Reconnaissance Office launched a new spy satellite called NROL-39 from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. Its logo features a giant octopus engulfing the world with the ominous words “Nothing is Beyond our Reach” underneath. Is there a better way to portray a nightmarish, big-brotherish totalitarian government? No. In fact, this exact imagery was used to portray “evil communists” a few decades ago. http://vigilantcitizen.com/latestnews/new-u-s-spy-satellite-logo-octopus-engulfing-world-words-nothing-beyond-reach-underneath/


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A Conspiracy So Vast

aa-Constitution - burning As a result of these revelations, no one has been fired, except Snowden, and the conspiracy has grown. Earlier this week, The Washington Post reported that the Federal Bureau of Investigation is now spying on us. It seems that the FBI, no doubt jealous of the unpunished lawlessness of the NSA, has acquired software that permits it to utilize the tiny cameras in many home computers to observe whoever or whatever may be in front of the computer screen. The FBI doesn’t only look at whoever is using the computer screen; it also captures the words and images on the screen. It seems to have an affinity for monitoring online gaming, even the lawful variety. In 1949, when George Orwell predicted in his terrifying novel “1984″ the future use of television sets to watch us in our homes, many thought he was a delusional paranoid. It turns out that he was just off by a generation. His predictions have come to pass. Like many growing conspiracies, this one has spawned others. The Washington Post also reported this week that local cops, too, are jealous of the NSA and its ability to break the law with impunity. In an effort to catch bad guys, local police in half a dozen American cities have begun to ask local telecom providers for a “tower dump.” A tower dump consists of digital recordings of all cellphone usage from a given cell tower. http://www.gopusa.com/commentary/2013/12/12/a-conspiracy-so-vast/?subscriber=1


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Ben Franklin Was Right About the NSA

The Church Committee revealed Washington’s role in the assassinations of foreign leaders, CIA collaboration with the Mafia, wide scale subversion around the globe, mail and phone intercepts, spying on Americans by the US Army and intelligence services, collusion with right-wing terrorist groups like Gladio, and much, much more. Edward Snowden’s revelations of NSA malfeasance have done much the same thing today. Both Church and Snowden were branded traitors by rightwing zealots and flag-wavers. Government security agencies were reined in for decades. But it’s now clear they are not only back to their old tricks, but are out of control. The gigantic rock lifted by the courageous Snowden revealed the chilling global reach of US electronic domination and intrusion. http://ericmargolis.com/2013/11/ben-franklin-was-right-about-the-nsa/


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Land of the Free Watch: Man Claims He Was Anally Probed 8 Times Following Traffic Stop For Drugs

A judge granted a search warrant to perform an anal cavity search on Eckert shortly after he was taken into custody. KOB reports that a doctor refused to perform the anal cavity search at a Deming emergency room, saying it was “unethical.” Eckert was then transported to Gila Regional Medical Center, where his alleged trauma began. According to the lawsuit and medical records, Eckert’s abdominal area was x-rayed twice, doctors stuck fingers in his anus twice, he had three enemas inserted anally and had a colonoscopy performed. No drugs were ever found during the search. “This is like something out of a science fiction film,” Kennedy told KOB. “Anal probing by government officials and public employees?” Eckert did not consent to any of the searches. http://lasvegas.cbslocal.com/2013/11/06/man-claims-he-was-anally-probed-8-times-following-traffic-stop-for-drugs/


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A Manifesto for the Truth by Edward Snowden

In a very short time, the world has learned much about unaccountable secret agencies and about sometimes illegal surveillance programs. Sometimes the agencies even deliberately try to hide their surveillance of high officials or the public. While the NSA and GCHQ seem to be the worst offenders – this is what the currently available documents suggest – we must not forget that mass surveillance is a global problem in need of global solutions. Such programs are not only a threat to privacy, they also threaten freedom of speech and open societies. The existence of spy technology should not determine policy. We have a moral duty to ensure that our laws and values limit monitoring programs and protect human rights. Society can only understand and control these problems through an open, respectful and informed debate. At first, some governments feeling embarrassed by the revelations of mass surveillance initiated an unprecedented campaign of persecution to supress this debate. They intimidated journalists and criminalized publishing the truth. At this point, the public was not yet able to evaluate the benefits of the revelations. They relied on their governments to decide correctly. Today we know that this was a mistake and that such action does not serve the public interest. The debate which they wanted to prevent will now take place in countries around the world. And instead of doing harm, the societal benefits of this new public knowledge is now clear, since reforms are now proposed in the form of increased oversight and new legislation. http://original.antiwar.com/Edward-Snowden/2013/11/03/a-manifesto-for-the-truth/#.UneZ8Mx96MM.email


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Obama, NSA Spying and the Dangers of Secretive, Authoritarian Government

Unfortunately, our so-called representatives in Congress are doing very little to combat the menace of unlawful surveillance, going out of their way to justify these programs and give them the trappings of legitimacy. Battles are being waged between civil liberties-minded representatives and law-and-order types such as Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), who is drafting a bill that would codify the NSA’s program of collecting the metadata of American communications. She supports her position by making nonsensical statements such as, “People believe it’s surveillance, but it’s not.” Contrary to Feinstein’s claims, the NSA is collecting personal information on every single person in the United States who uses a computer or phone. Ultimately, it comes down to whether you want an open, transparent and therefore free government or a closed, secretive, authoritarian regime. For those who claim to want open and free government, it’s time to restore the rightful balance in government and make it clear to our leaders that these spying programs are unacceptable and will not be tolerated. Remember, a true patriot is one who upholds the principles upon which his country was founded, not the power of those who have hijacked the nation. http://www.lewrockwell.com/2013/11/john-w-whitehead/welcome-to-the-secret-government%e2%80%a8/


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putnamvt

Do Israeli dual citizens like Senator Feinstein consider spies like Jonathan Pollard traitors or patriots?

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NSA Surveillance of the Pope a Good Thing

Because it will anger a lot of Catholics. Worldwide, there are over a billion Catholics. In the United States, there are over 78 million, about 25 percent of the population. Imagine if they got it together politically and moved to put an end to NSA surveillance, an illegal practice the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, Mike Rogers, said yesterday is fine and dandy because there’s no privacy in America. Our government and its grocery clerks masquerading as civil servants support this Constitution-busting criminal behavior. http://www.infowars.com/nsa-surveillance-of-the-pope-a-good-thing/


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Surveillance is for Peons

You don’t have to be a mind-reader to understand what enrages Feinstein. Merkel and the other world leaders we’ve been caught eavesdropping on are all members of a transnational political elite of which Feinstein is a leading figure. The political class – in this country and around the world – reserves to itself certain perks and privileges, one of which is the absolute sanctity of their esteemed persons: for example, when they commit a crime, as Glenn Greenwald showed so exhaustively in his book on the subject, they very rarely go to jail. Even if they’re convicted of a crime in a court of law they nearly always manage to get off with a slap on the wrist – that is, if they don’t elude punishment altogether. These worthies like to think they enjoy a similar immunity when it comes to living under the watchful eye of the all-seeing Surveillance State, and here we come to the real source of Feinstein’s fury. She’s all for the NSA rifling around in our online lives but I’ll bet she’s wondering in the back of her mind if they’re eavesdropping on her – and I wouldn’t be surprised if they were. How many of our Washington power brokers are wondering the same thing? Indeed, NSA whistleblower Russell Tice claims Obama was himself the subject of the NSA’s snooping, and of all those programs we are being assured have been discontinued this is the only one we can be sure is no longer operational. http://original.antiwar.com/justin/2013/10/29/surveillance-is-for-peons/#.UnEdZNXNl-w.email


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Israel and the NSA: Partners in Crime

much of the surveillance technology in use by the NSA originated in Israel, and was developed by Israeli companies with ties – direct subsidies, board memberships, etc. – to the Israeli government, and specifically its intelligence services. This would make is easy for the Israelis to construct a “back door” that would give them access to the system. http://original.antiwar.com/justin/2013/10/27/israel-and-the-nsa-partners-in-crime/#.Um5pbDMJlAo.email


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Land of the Free Watch: As Europe Erupts Over U.S. Spying, NSA Chief Says Government Must Stop Media

Keith Alexander

The most under-discussed aspect of the NSA story has long been its international scope. That all changed this week as both Germany and France exploded with anger over new revelations about pervasive NSA surveillance on their population and democratically elected leaders. http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/oct/25/europe-erupts-nsa-spying-chief-government


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A Government of Secrecy and Fear

Every American who values the rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness, every American who enjoys the right to be different and the right to be left alone, and every American who believes that the government works for us and we don’t work for the government should thank Edward Snowden for his courageous and heroic revelations of the National Security Agency’s gargantuan spying operations. Without Snowden’s revelations, we would be ignorant children to a paternalistic government and completely in the dark about what the government sees of us and knows about us. And we would not know that it has stolen our freedoms. http://original.antiwar.com/andrew-p-napolitano/2013/10/23/a-government-of-secrecy-and-fear/#.Umk4__Yy-rE.email


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The Hidden Corporate Cash Behind America’s Out-of-Control National Surveillance State

Democratic leaders are full-fledged players in the national surveillance state, right along with Republicans. http://admin.alternet.org/economy/surveillance-state-and-democrats?paging=off&current_page=1#bookmark


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The Neutering of the NSA Archives

There is not a single word in the entire story to suggest, even remotely, that there is anything wrong with the government of the United States running high-tech death squads and blanketing the globe with a level of invasive surveillance far beyond the dreams of Stalin or the Stasi. There is not even a single comment from some token ‘serious’ person objecting to the policy on realpolitik grounds: i.e., that such actions create more terrorists (as the Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai told Obama to his face last week), or engender hatred for the U.S., destabilize volatile regions, etc. etc. There is not a shred of even this very tepid, ‘loyal opposition’ type of tidbit that usually crops up in the 15th or 25th paragraph of such stories. But there was, of course, plenty of room for quotes like this: “Ours is a noble cause,” NSA Director Keith B. Alexander said during a public event last month. “Our job is to defend this nation and to protect our civil liberties and privacy.” Makes you want to puddle up with patriotic pride, don’t it? These noble, noble guardians of ours: peeping through our digital windows, rifling through our inboxes, listening to our personal conversations, reading our private thoughts, tracking our purchases (underwear, fishing gear, sex toys, books, movies, tampons, anything, everything), recording our dreams, our interests, our belief, our desires, skulking in the shadows, pushing buttons to kill people … yes, noble is certainly the first word that comes to mind. http://www.counterpunch.org/2013/10/21/the-neutering-of-the-nsa-archives/


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Edward Snowden’s Brave Integrity

One of the things that impressed me most was Ed’s emphasis on the “younger generation” he represents – typically those who have grown up with the Internet – who have (scarcely-fathomable-to-my-generation) technical expertise and equally remarkable dedication to keeping it free – AND have a conscience. My first personal exposure to the depth, breadth and importance of this critical mass of those often dismissed as “hackers” came at the OHM2013 conference outside of Amsterdam in early August. The James Clappers and Keith Alexanders of this world simply CANNOT do what they see as their job of snooping on the lot of us on this planet without this incredibly talented and dedicated generation. They CANNOT; and so they are in deep kimchi. If only a small percentage of this young generation have the integrity and courage of an Ed Snowden, the prospect is dim that repressive measures in violation of citizens’ rights previously taken for granted can succeed for very long without full disclosure. That is the good news. And with each new Snowden-enabled disclosure of infringements on our liberties, it becomes more likely that an awakened public will create sustained pressure for restoration of our Constitutional rights, and for holding accountable those senior government officials who have crassly violated those rights, and continue to violate Ed Snowden’s rights simply because he made it possible for us to know the truth. http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article36532.htm#.Ul6dPE4tb2E.email


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The Data Hackers – Mining Your Information for Big Brother

But there is a second kind of data company of which most people are unaware: high-tech outfits that simply help themselves to our information in order to allow U.S. government agencies to dig into our past and present. Some of this is legal, since most of us have signed away the rights to our own information on digital forms that few ever bother to read, but much of it is, to put the matter politely, questionable. This second category is made up of professional surveillance companies. They generally work for or sell their products to the government – in other words, they are paid with our tax dollars – but we have no control over them. Harris Corporation provides technology to the FBI to track, via our mobile phones, where we go; Glimmerglass builds tools that the U.S. intelligence community can use to intercept our overseas calls; and companies like James Bimen Associates design software to hack into our computers. There is also a third category: data brokers like Arkansas-based Acxiom. These companies monitor our Google searches and sell the information to advertisers. They make it possible for Target to offer baby clothes to pregnant teenagers, but also can keep track of your reading habits and the questions you pose to Google on just about anything from pornography to terrorism, presumably to sell you Viagra and assault rifles. http://original.antiwar.com/engelhardt/2013/10/08/the-data-hackers-mining-your-information-for-big-brother/#.UlVRo8Hdfgs.email


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A Day in the Life of Edward Snowden: Under Guard, Secret Address, Learning Russian, and Heavily Disguised

If Obama’s intention with the fast and furious series of geopolitical and domestic distractions over the past three months was to sideline Edward Snowden’s revelations of the biggest spying scandal since Nixon, he appears to have largely succeeded: not only has America become largely numb to every successive iteration of shockers emerging from the most important whistleblowing episode in recent U.S. history (and in fact can’t wait to get even more in debt to purchase shiny, faux-gold fingerprint scanners), but the person behind these revelations, the 30 year old Snowden himself, has largely faded into the collective subconscious. So what is the Russian asylum-seeker doing now that the fruits of his labor has been largely exposed and the U.S. public is already eager for the next big watercooler scandal, popcorn in hand? As AFP reports, it is all but life as usual for the whistleblower: “U.S. intelligence leaker Edward Snowden is living under guard at a secret address in Russia and sometimes emerges in disguise, although he remains in such danger that even a family visit could endanger his security, his lawyer said Monday.” Follows a detailed update from AFP on the daily life of the most infamous U.S. expat living somewhere in Russia. http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-09-23/day-life-edward-snowden-under-guard-secret-address-learning-russian-and-heavily-disg


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Spy Agencies Are Doing WHAT?

Revelations about the breathtaking scope of government spying are coming so fast that it’s time for an updated roundup. http://www.zerohedge.com/contributed/2013-09-23/spy-agencies-are-doing-what


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Destroying the Right to Be Left Alone

While in these last months the NSA has cast a long, dark shadow over American privacy, don’t for a second imagine that it’s the only government agency systematically and often secretly intruding on our lives. In fact, a remarkable traffic jam of local, state, and federal government authorities turn out to be exploiting technology to wriggle into the most intimate crevices of our lives, take notes, use them for their own purposes, or simply file them away for years on end. “Technology in this world is moving faster than government or law can keep up,” the CIA’s Chief Technology Officer Gus Hunt told a tech conference in March. “It’s moving faster I would argue than you can keep up: You should be asking the question of what are your rights and who owns your data.” Hunt’s right. The American public and the legal system have been left in the dust when it comes to infringements and intrusions on privacy. In one way, however, he was undoubtedly being coy. After all, the government is an active, eager, and early adopter of intrusive technologies that make citizens’ lives transparent on demand. Increasingly, the relationship between Americans and their government has come to resemble a one-way mirror dividing an interrogation room. Its operatives and agents can see us whenever they want, while we can never quite be sure if there’s someone on the other side of the glass watching and recording what we say or what we do – and many within local, state, and federal government want to ensure that no one ever flicks on the light on their side of the glass. http://original.antiwar.com/engelhardt/2013/09/22/destroying-the-right-to-be-left-alone/


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11 Million Users Drop Facebook Over Privacy Concerns

New research shows Facebook has lost a total of 11 million users, nine million in the US and two million in Britain. Researchers at the University of Vienna analyzed 600 users and found they quit for reasons like privacy concerns, general dissatisfaction, shallow conversations and fear of becoming addicted, Alalam reported. http://intellihub.com/2013/09/18/11-million-users-drop-facebook-privacy-concerns/


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Dictatorship Watch: NSA Shares Raw Intelligence Including Americans’ Data With Israel

The National Security Agency routinely shares raw intelligence data with Israel without first sifting it to remove information about U.S. citizens, a top-secret document provided to the Guardian by whistleblower Edward Snowden reveals. Details of the intelligence-sharing agreement are laid out in a memorandum of understanding between the NSA and its Israeli counterpart that shows the U.S. government handed over intercepted communications likely to contain phone calls and emails of American citizens. The agreement places no legally binding limits on the use of the data by the Israelis. The disclosure that the NSA agreed to provide raw intelligence data to a foreign country contrasts with assurances from the Obama administration that there are rigorous safeguards to protect the privacy of U.S. citizens caught in the dragnet. The intelligence community calls this process “minimization”, but the memorandum makes clear that the information shared with the Israelis would be in its pre-minimized state. http://www.lewrockwell.com/2013/09/no_author/nsa-shares-spy-data-on-americans/


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No Privacy Left on Offshore Assets

When struggling consumers hear about offshore banking, they naturally think such assets only apply to the rich. Secret bank accounts issued in the name of a confidential number, often portrayed in mystery movies, are less prevalent than a stake in an oversea property estate. Cash in a financial institution is an easy reporting task for foreign banks. Although, most Americans do not possess such wealth, many do have an interest in real property or chattel ownership in portable entities that are outside the physical soil of the country. Even if you are not one of these fortunate beneficiaries, the principle behind the (FATCA) statue can certainly apply a broad interpretation domestically. http://www.batr.org/negotium/082813.html


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Thirteen Things the Government is Trying to Keep Secret From You

The President, the Head of the National Security Agency (NSA), the Department of Justice, the House and Senate Intelligence Committees, and the Judiciary, are intentionally keeping massive amounts of information about surveillance of U.S. and other people secret from voters. Additionally, some are, to say it politely, not being factually accurate in what they are telling the public. These inaccurate statements are either intentional lies meant to mislead the public or they are evidence that the people who are supposed to be in charge of oversight do not know what they are supposed to be overseeing. The most recent revelations from the Washington Post, by way of Edward Snowden, indicate the NSA breaks privacy rules or overstep its legal authority thousands of times each year. Whether people are lying or do not know what they are doing, either way, this is a significant crisis. Here are thirteen examples. http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article35950.htm#.Uhi2aLFuDW0.email


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Dictatorship Watch: Obama Urges Supreme Court to Allow Warrantless Cellphone Searches

The summer of data grabs continues. President Obama is now pushing the Supreme Court to overturn a ruling by the First Circuit Court of Appeals that insists that police need a search warrant to go through the data on your cell phone looking for information to use against you. http://news.antiwar.com/2013/08/20/obama-urges-supreme-court-to-allow-warrantless-cellphone-searches/


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The NSA: ‘The Abyss from Which There is No Return’

We now find ourselves operating in a strange paradigm where the government not only views the citizenry as suspects but treats them as suspects, as well. Thus, the news that the National Security Agency (NSA) is routinely operating outside of the law and overstepping its legal authority by carrying out surveillance on American citizens is not really much of a surprise. This is what happens when you give the government broad powers and allow government agencies to routinely sidestep the Constitution. Indeed, as I document in my book, A Government of Wolves: The Emerging American Police State, these newly revealed privacy violations by the NSA are just the tip of the iceberg. Consider that the government’s Utah Data Center (UDC), the central hub of the NSA’s vast spying infrastructure, will be a clearinghouse and a depository for every imaginable kind of information—whether innocent or not, private or public—including communications, transactions and the like. In fact, anything and everything you’ve ever said or done, from the trivial to the damning—phone calls, Facebook posts, Twitter tweets, Google searches, emails, bookstore and grocery purchases, bank statements, commuter toll records, etc.—will be tracked, collected, catalogued and analyzed by the UDC’s supercomputers and teams of government agents. http://www.lewrockwell.com/2013/08/john-w-whitehead/the-abyss-from-which-there-is-no-return/


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Why the 2,776 NSA Violations Are No Big Deal

by Ron Paul. Americans are increasingly concerned over these violations of their privacy. Calls for reform grow. However, whenever Washington finds itself in a scandal, the government responds by naming a government panel made up of current and former government employees to investigate any mistakes the government might have made. The recommendations invariably are that even more government employees must be hired to provide an additional layer or two of oversight. That is supposed to reassure us that reforms have been made, while in fact it is just insiders covering up for those who have hired them to investigate. Let us hope the American people will decide that such trickery is no longer acceptable. It is time to take a very serious look at the activities of the U.S. intelligence community. The first step would be a dramatic reduction in appropriations to force a focus on those real, not imagined, threats to our national security. We should not be considered the enemy. http://www.lewrockwell.com/2013/08/ron-paul/those-2776-nsa-violations/


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Kucinich: ‘Everybody Lies To Congress; Abolish NSA, Celebrate Snowden’

Dennis Kucinich

Former Congressman Dennis Kucinich slammed the Obama administration late last week, saying that the NSA should be completely abolished, and that whistleblower Edward Snowden should be celebrated with a ticker-tape parade. Kucinich, known for his strong stance on privacy and civil liberties, urged attendees at the premiere of a documentary on government and corporate abuse of digital data that it was unacceptable to allow the government to continue to destroy constitutional rights. http://www.infowars.com/kucinich-everybody-lies-to-congress-abolish-nsa-celebrate-snowden/


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What We Lose if We Give Up Privacy

Privacy is connected to personhood. It has to do with intimate things—the innards of your head and heart, the workings of your mind—and the boundary between those things and the world outside. A loss of the expectation of privacy in communications is a loss of something personal and intimate, and it will have broader implications. http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887323639704579015101857760922.html


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You Won’t Believe What’s Going on With Government Spying on Americans

While the Obama administration is spying on everyone in the country – it is at the same time the most secretive administration ever. That’s despite Obama saying he’s running the most transparent administration ever. http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2013/08/you-wont-believe-whats-going-on-with-government-spying-on-americans.html


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On the Cusp

Remember that our lawmakers are forbidden from explicitly describing the level of surveillance the law now allows: in warning against what is being done in the dark, Sen. Ron Wyden has had to use elliptical language – much as someone who lived in the former Soviet Union at the height of the Stalin terror was restrained from describing ordinary everyday horrors in a letter to relatives living overseas. Legislators can’t debate the law, they can’t challenge the law, because the government’s secret interpretation of the law is highly classified – we aren’t allowed to know about it. When it comes to the Surveillance State, many of the traditional avenues of resistance are closed to us. For example, take Ladar Levison, head of Lavabit, a company that recently folded rather than cave in to the government’s demands. What were those demands? Well, Levison can’t say: if he does, the government can charge him, lock him up, and throw away the key. What he did say is that he was forced to make a choice between being “complicit in crimes against the American people” and Lavabit, an email service that allowed users to encrypt their communications (Snowden was reportedly among their customers). He chose the honorable course – but is prevented from telling us exactly why. We are told all this secrecy is necessary because, after all, we’re at war, and our enemies abroad are relentlessly pursuing any and all weaknesses in the system in order to destroy us. Yet there is reason to suspect that the nature of this “enemy” is far different from what we’ve been led to believe: it isn’t some terrorist hiding in a cave somewhere – because the “enemy” is us, i.e. the American people. http://original.antiwar.com/justin/2013/08/13/data-gate-shows-were-on-the-cusp/


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Greenwald: NSA Supporters Exploiting ‘Terror Threats’ to Kill Fourth Amendment

“For eight straight years, literally, Democrats, every time there was a terrorist alert or a terrorist advisory issued by the United States government in the middle of a debate over one of the Bush-Cheney civil liberties abuses, would accuse the United States government and the national security state of exaggerating terrorism threats, of manipulating advisories, of hyping the dangers of al-Qaeda, in order to distract attention away from their abuses and to scare the population into submitting to whatever it is they wanted to do,” Greenwald said. “And so, here we are in the midst of one of the most intense debates and sustained debates that we’ve had in a very long time in this country over the dangers of excess surveillance and suddenly an administration that has spent two years claiming that it has decimated al-Qaeda decides that there is this massive threat that involves the closing of embassies and consulates throughout the world.” http://www.infowars.com/greenwald-nsa-supporters-exploiting-terrorist-threats-to-kill-fourth-amendment/


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Why Won’t They Tell Us the Truth About NSA Spying?

The NSA's new humongous data storing center in Utah

by Ron Paul. In 2001, the Patriot Act opened the door to U.S. government monitoring of Americans without a warrant. It was unconstitutional, but most in Congress over my strong objection were so determined to do something after the attacks of 9/11 that they did not seem to give it too much thought. Civil liberties groups were concerned, and some of us in Congress warned about giving up our liberties even in the post-9/11 panic. But at the time most Americans did not seem too worried about the intrusion. This complacency has suddenly shifted given recent revelations of the extent of government spying on Americans. Politicians and bureaucrats are faced with serious backlash from Americans outraged that their most personal communications are intercepted and stored. They had been told that only the terrorists would be monitored. In response to this anger, defenders of the program have time and again resorted to spreading lies and distortions. But these untruths are now being exposed very quickly. http://original.antiwar.com/paul/2013/08/04/why-wont-they-tell-us-the-truth-about-nsa-spying/#.Uf_IY06YWiY.email


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Major Opinion Shifts, in the U.S. and Congress, On NSA Surveillance and Privacy

Overall, 47% say their greater concern about government anti-terrorism policies is that they have gone too far in restricting the average person’s civil liberties, while 35% say they are more concerned that policies have not gone far enough to protect the country. This is the first time in Pew Research polling that more have expressed concern over civil liberties than protection from terrorism since the question was first asked in 2004. For anyone who spent the post-9/11 years defending core liberties against assaults relentlessly perpetrated in the name of terrorism, polling data like that is nothing short of shocking. This Pew visual underscores what a radical shift has occurred from these recent NSA disclosures. http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article35687.htm#.Ufe9MAVS2rA.email


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‘You Are Who Google Says You Are’

Now this won’t help those who’re trying to dodge corporate or government surveillance of the internet and communications, and it won’t do squat for NSA leaker extraordinaire Edward Snowden who has shown a phenomenal knack for turning himself into one of the hottest brand names on the internet, but for people with lesser challenges and not quite the opportunities, there is a whole industry that has jumped into this maelstrom where “privacy is dead” but where you can manage what appears online, and so Michael Zammuto, president of Brand.com reviews how to get a grip on it. “Google yourself because you are who Google says you are,” he wrote on his Linkedin page for just the sort of recalcitrant people like me who grew up in a different era when you still were who you said you were. Or at least you were what you did, or what others said you did, or what clothes you wore, or whatever. But Google didn’t figure into the equation. It does now. “Get over it,” Sun Microsystems CEO Scott McNealy admonished us back in 1999 during the dotcom bubble when his company’s stock was one of the irrationally exuberant highflyers before it transitioned to a penny stock to be gobbled up by Oracle. But apparently, his words fell on my deaf ears because I still haven’t gotten over it. I cling to my illusions of privacy. And companies are in the same boat. Just about any entity that does anything is in some form or other on the internet. It’s all part of one of the few growth industries these days: Big Data, a massive accumulation of data that will never be purged or deleted, but will grow exponentially – “Facebook must add several petabytes of storage per day to keep up with its users,” Businessweek observed laconically. It documents even the tiniest shred of information for all times to come, while it gets analyzed, combined, mined, and used endlessly. http://www.testosteronepit.com/home/2013/7/28/you-are-who-google-says-you-are-says-exec-as-his-brandcom-re.html


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Edward Snowden’s Fear of Flying is Justified

Snowden is a refugee, not a spy. But America has history when it comes to forcing down planes in defiance of international law. http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2013/jul/23/snowden-asylum-america-international-law


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Kafka’s America: Secret Courts, Secret Laws, and Total Surveillance

In a bizarre and ludicrous attempt at “transparency,” the Obama administration has announced that it asked a secret court to approve a secret order to allow the government to keep spying on millions of Americans, and the secret court has granted its request. Late on Friday, July 19, 2013, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC) – a secret court which operates out of an undisclosed federal building in Washington, DC – quietly renewed an order from the National Security Agency to have Verizon Communications hand over hundreds of millions of Americans’ telephone records to government officials. In so doing, the government has doubled down on the numerous spying programs currently aimed at the American people, some of which were exposed by whistleblower Edward Snowden, who temporarily pulled back the veil on the government’s gigantic spying apparatus. As a sign of just how disconnected and out-of-touch with reality those in the Beltway are, National Intelligence Director James Clapper actually suggested that declassifying and publicly disclosing the government application was a show of good faith by the government. The order, submitted by the federal government and approved by the FISC, is set to expire every three months and is re-approved without fail. This is the bizarre logic which now defines American governance: it doesn’t matter if we spy on you without your consent, so long as you know that we’re doing it, and so long as we give the impression that there is a process by which a court reviews the order. http://original.antiwar.com/jwhitehead/2013/07/23/kafkas-america-secret-courts-secret-laws-and-total-surveillance/#.Ue_VFFTs8-8.email


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Land of the Free Watch: Arkansas Police Add Saliva Tests to Check for Drugs and Alcohol

A new Arkansas state law sponsored by Sen. Jake Files, passed in March but went into effect July 17, allows law enforcement to test an individual’s saliva for drugs and alcohol. The test that originated in Sebastian County is popular in Europe and is slowly gaining acceptance in the U.S. Channel 5 news reports that Lieutenant Allan Marx with the Sebastian County Sheriff’s Department was the “driving force” behind the new legislation. Not only is Marx behind the new law, but he is a distributor for the product. Marx is selling the test called OralTox, created by Premier Biotech at http://www.gotchadwi.com/ for 25 per case at $298.75. http://www.infowars.com/arkansas-police-add-saliva-tests-to-check-for-drugs-and-alcohol/


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LabMan

Lt.Allan "Marx" hmmmmmmmm!

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In Secret, Court Vastly Broadens Powers of NSA

In more than a dozen classified rulings, the nation’s surveillance court has created a secret body of law giving the National Security Agency the power to amass vast collections of data on Americans while pursuing not only terrorism suspects, but also people possibly involved in nuclear proliferation, espionage and cyberattacks, officials say. The rulings, some nearly 100 pages long, reveal that the court has taken on a much more expansive role by regularly assessing broad constitutional questions and establishing important judicial precedents, with almost no public scrutiny, according to current and former officials familiar with the court’s classified decisions. The 11-member Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, known as the FISA court, was once mostly focused on approving case-by-case wiretapping orders. But since major changes in legislation and greater judicial oversight of intelligence operations were instituted six years ago, it has quietly become almost a parallel Supreme Court, serving as the ultimate arbiter on surveillance issues and delivering opinions that will most likely shape intelligence practices for years to come, the officials said. http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/07/us/in-secret-court-vastly-broadens-powers-of-nsa.html?_r=0


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Is the Safety of the State Really Worth More Than the Truth?

It’s a strange and terrible tragedy when a culture forgets its own history and identity. It is even more tragic when that culture becomes deluded enough to think it can replace its heritage from scratch; that it can conjure political and social reformations out of thin air, and abandon the centuries upon centuries of accomplishment and failures of generations past. To think that one can live without the lessons and principles of one’s ancestors is a disease – a mental disorder of the highest caliber. It is an insanity that leads to terrifying catastrophe. http://www.alt-market.com/articles/1593-is-the-safety-of-the-state-really-worth-more-than-the-truth


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NSA Admits It Analyzes More People’s Data Than Previously Revealed

As an aside during testimony on Capitol Hill today, a National Security Agency representative rather casually indicated that the government looks at data from a universe of far, far more people than previously indicated. http://www.theatlanticwire.com/politics/2013/07/nsa-admits-it-analyzes-more-peoples-data-previously-revealed/67287/


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Lindsey Graham Celebrates the Death of the Constitution

Lindsey Graham is not a right-winger. He is an establishment neocon. Graham is one of the primary promoters of the contrived war on terror. It’s his job to push the idea that cartoonish Muslims in far away caves pose an ominous threat to the United States. He says due to this never-ending supposed threat we must surrender our constitutional rights and consent to the military industrial complex stealing trillions of our hard-earned dollars in order to wage illegal and criminal wars in places of interest to banksters and transnational corporations. Instead of protesting the loss of liberty, we are expected to celebrate its demise, as Graham does, and thank the state for its intrusion into the minutest personal details of our lives. http://www.infowars.com/lindsey-graham-celebrates-the-death-of-the-constitution/


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Doublespeak Watch: Obama — Mass Surveillance Protects Civil Liberties

With the PRISM program, which allows the NSA to directly, warrantlessly spy on virtually all communications on the Internet, and other NSA schemes surveilling literally every phone call made in the United States, America has struck the “right balance” between privacy and government power, according to President Barack Obama, adding that spying on the myriad details of Americans’ lives actually protects civil liberties. Obama insisted it was impossible to have “100 percent security and also have 100 percent privacy,” adding that it was up to the government to make the choice. It seems the answer was to put the sliding scale all the way to the authoritarian side, ushering in a privacy-free era of always-on surveillance. http://news.antiwar.com/2013/06/07/obama-mass-internet-surveillance-the-right-balance-on-privacy/#.UbMkQDdkvpA.email


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A Rare Victory Over the Surveillance State — Court Curbs Laptop Searches at U.S. Border

A federal appeals court on Friday said Customs and Border Protection officers cannot confiscate or download every laptop or electronic device brought into the U.S., ruling that people have an expectation their data are private and that the government must have “reasonable suspicion” before it starts to do any intensive snooping. In a broad ruling, the court also said merely putting password protection on information is not enough to trigger the government’s “reasonable suspicion” to conduct a more intrusive search — but can be taken into account along with other factors. http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2013/mar/8/court-limits-feds-ability-search-laptops-border/?utm_source=RSS_Feed&utm_medium=RSS


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Your Own Smart Phone, Turned Against You

As The Guardian reported just recently, the defense industry is already working with Raytheon to build its own application that would map our physical movements, as well as our activity on social networking sites, including Facebook, Google, Twitter and FourSquare, which taken together, can drill down on both the location and buying habits of millions of users a day. http://original.antiwar.com/vlahos/2013/02/18/your-own-smart-phone-turned-against-you/


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Google Moves to Destroy Online Anonymity, Unintentionally Helping Authoritarian Governments

Do you have a right to anonymous political free speech? According to the Supreme Court, you do. According to the Department of Homeland Security, you don’t. They’ve hired General Dynamics to track U.S. citizens exercising this critical civil right. http://www.globalresearch.ca/google-moves-to-destroy-online-anonymity-unintentionally-helping-authoritarian-governments/5322542


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Think Privacy is Threatened Today — Just Wait Until Tomorrow

Only a century ago, most people were known only by name and occupation. Records of your great-grandparents’ existence were likely limited to birth records, baptismal records, death records, census records, the purchase of a home, and perhaps the payment of property tax. Even this information was generally filed and forgotten, because of the considerable expense involved in paying clerks to organize it. Your great-grandparents could purchase primitive telephones, automobiles, and electric appliances, if they could afford them. However, no systematic recordkeeping existed of the phone calls they made or where they drove in their vehicle. Of course, no cell phones existed, no Internet, and no biometric tools to identify anyone other than basic fingerprinting. Fast-forward from 1912 to 2012, and we enter a very different era. Here are a few examples from my files. http://lewrockwell.com/nestmann/nestmann44.1.html


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Why Pay Big $$$ to Get Frisked, Fondled and Insulted by TSA Thugs?

In my early adulthood going to a Bears game at Chicago’s Solider Field with girlfriends included a small bottle of brandy and a blanket. The blanket was used to keep warm while concealing certain enjoyable other mischief during the game. Back then going to a major sporting event was a lot of fun. However in recent decades sports teams and certain venues have begun an effort to frisk patrons. I hate this despicable effort; frankly we’ve fought wars so we’d never have to submit to this kind of crap. The majority of patrons are too young and just don’t understand the serious implications of what they are willingly accepting. http://www.crimefilenews.com/2012/08/why-pay-big-to-get-frisked-fondled-and.html


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Destroying Internet Freedom Through Taxation

If there was ever a tool to liberate the minds and spirit of mankind, the internet revivals the printing press. The freedom to connect worldwide is awesome. However, the power of governments and corporatists to strip away your privacy and personality is frightening. Access to the web is desirable for those who choose to make the connection. Even so, they must bear the risk and responsibility of linking into the supercomputers of the snoops and spooks. http://www.batr.org/negotium/082912.html


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Privacy as a Positive Good

We’ve all heard the insulting, tyrannical cliché: Why do you care, if you have nothing to hide? The comeback, if not that it would fall on deaf ears, should be this: Because I value myself. The real value of privacy is not because it allows us to hide things, it’s that privacy allows us to develop independently – according to our own natures. In other words, privacy is an essential tool for personal development. Privacy is a positive good, not merely a tool for hiding things. http://www.lewrockwell.com/orig11/rosenberg-p6.1.1.html


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NSA Wants ‘EZ Pass’ Control for Internet

Keith Alexander

General Keith Alexander, the NSA boss, wants the government to centralize the internet and force users to use a system analogous to EZ Pass. EZ Pass is an RFID transponder system used for toll collection on roads, bridges, and tunnels in the United States. http://www.infowars.com/nsa-wants-ez-pass-control-for-internet/


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Look Up in the Sky and See a Drone

All Americans should be asking their elected officials about the limits of the use of drones — before it’s too late. One option is to eliminate federal grants that subsidize drones for police departments. Another is to mandate that police obtain a warrant in circumstances where drones can surveil a private residence or anywhere else citizens have a reasonable expectation of privacy. Militarization at home, as the Founding Fathers argued centuries ago, is inconsistent with the values of a free society. Since 9/11, some in Washington seem to have forgotten that a free society depends on a citizenry whose natural rights are protected by a limited and accountable government — not by a government that uses high-tech, stealth video cameras to constantly surveil the public wherever and whenever it wants. http://www.nydailynews.com/opinion/sky-a-drone-article-1.1096621


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Companies Most Compliant With Big Brother Include Verizon, AT&T, Apple, Microsoft, Foursquare

When you use the Internet, you entrust your online conversations, thoughts, experiences, locations, photos, and more to companies like Google, AT&T and Facebook. But what happens when the government demands that these companies to hand over your private information? Will the company stand with you? http://www.disinfo.com/2012/06/companies-most-compliant-with-big-brother-include-verizon-att-apple-microsoft-foursquare/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+disinfo%2FoMPh+%28Disinformation%29


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Facebook and Google Turned Into Government Spies? The Dangerous New Law Before Congress (CISPA)

The U.S. House of Representatives is expected to pass a reprehensible cyber-security bill this week that seeks to protect online companies—giant social media firms to data-sharing networks controlling utilities—from cyber attack. It is reprehensible because, as Democratic San Jose Rep. Zoe Lofgren said this week, it gives the federal government too much access to the private lives of every Internet user. Or as Libertarian Rep. Ron Paul also bluntly put it, it turns Facebook and Google into “government spies.” But that’s not the biggest problem with the Congress’s urge to address a real problem—protecting the Internet from cyber attacks. While House passage launches a process that continues in the Senate, the bigger problem with the best known of the cyber bills before the House, CISPA, the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act, is not what is in it — which is troubling enough — but what is not on Congress’s desk: a comprehensive approach to stop basic constitutional rights from eroding in the Internet Age. http://www.alternet.org/news/155156


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Land of the Free Watch: Thirteen Ways Government Tracks Us

Privacy is eroding fast as technology offers government increasing ways to track and spy on citizens. The Washington Post reported there are 3,984 federal, state and local organizations working on domestic counterterrorism. Most collect information on people in the U.S. Here are thirteen examples of how some of the biggest government agencies and programs track people. http://www.blacklistednews.com/Thirteen_Ways_Government_Tracks_Us_/18880/0/0/0/Y/M.html


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‘Officer Safety’ Uber Alles: The Coercion Cartel’s Prime Directive

When intruders seek to enter a home without permission, observed the Post-Bulletin, “those on the other side of the door don’t always know that it’s a police officer who is entering their residence. They might have been asleep, awakening only when they hear the sounds of a door being kicked in or footsteps on the stairs. Their judgment and awareness might be impaired by drugs, alcohol, mental illness or the belief that an abusive ex-boyfriend or rival gang members many have arrived with bad intentions.” A likelier scenario involves the even deadlier possibility that the door has been forced open by state-licensed marauders who can kill anyone within the dwelling with impunity. http://lewrockwell.com/grigg/grigg-w248.html


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What Will We Say?

What will we say when the government announces that “for security reasons” it will begin conducting random checks of our homes? That we will be required by law to open our doors and stand aside while government agents do a walk-through, just to “be sure” and (of course) “to keep us safe”? It is a serious question, not (as I will be accused of purveying) exaggerated or paranoiac. After all, we are already told specifically that we have no legal expectation of privacy when we’re out in public and it’s been implicit for years now that we have very little left in the way of Fourth Amendment rights anywhere – even in our own homes. http://poorrichards-blog.blogspot.com/2011/11/what-will-we-say.html


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Conrad

The Red Coats might want to work on keeping themselves safe, preferably by minding their own business.

kevin

They will be staring down the barrel of a gun!

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Facebook is Building Shadow Profiles of Non-Users

Even if you don’t use it, you may already have a profile on Facebook. http://yro.slashdot.org/story/11/10/18/1429223/Facebook-Is-Building-Shadow-Profiles-of-Non-Users?utm_source=slashdot&utm_medium=twitter


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JamesinUSA

Luke, I often copy and paste, or take advantage of spreading nationalist ideals and information on my facebook page that I believe is necessary for our people to come to terms with, with what's happening to us as a people and a nation. I can well understand your concerns, but we can't allow our fears of this government to stop us from taking our message to as many people as possible, even if it might mean our giving up our very lives at some future date in time. This is what 'Revolution' is really all about. Face book, My Space, the Internet in general, has been revolutionary in spreading ideas that otherwise could never have been known by people if not for this media, a media that the Left even now is trying their best to shut-down. We might as well take advantage of it while we still can.

Luke

I've been noticing that an increasing number of news web sites that allow comments to be posted are now trying to force people to get facebook accounts in order to post a comment about an article. When I encounter this, I do not comply and do not comment. What's going on is obvious - for those of us who've studied the history of the USSR and who've listened to the excellent Youtube video interviews of Yuri Bezmenov where he outlines how the Communists would seek to profile people and maintain their list of dissidents who they intended to assassinate, once they had consolidated their complete power over Russia. Oh, and here is something that is very odd - I quite often see examples of people who are supposedly part of the 'patriot movement' or 'white nationalist' movement trying to encourage their fellow community members to participate in the whole 'facebook' adventure. It occurs to me that legitimate patriot movement groups and legitimate white nationalist movement groups would be doing the opposite - discouraging the use of these kinds of big brother mechanisms and warning their followers to avoid them like the plague. Unless, of course, this advice is really coming from sources which are controlled opposition front groups and the goal is to help establish lists of dissidents who will be awarded a bullet at some point in the near future?

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Land of the Free Watch: Government Now Tracking Cash Cards?

The U.S. government has found another way to invade privacy in the name of fighting terrorism by proposing legislation that would track prepaid debit cards. As usual, the real losers would be, not terrorists who won’t comply anyway, but innocent Americans, or travelers, and card issuers burdened with yet another layer of record keeping and compliance procedures. http://www.activistpost.com/2011/09/us-government-tracking-cash-cards.html


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Luke

I've believed for a very long time that this effort we are seeing to push the use of plastic for purchasing everything under the sun has a number of very sinister agendas which our hostile ruling elites are striving to promote. First of all, the electronic tracking and monitoring of everything people buy. Secondly, there is the usury angle - to persuade gentiles to buy everything on credit cards, which increases the amount of interest that the usury gang can collect from the gentiles. And, there is also perhaps the most dangerous agenda of all - the control angle. If these ruling elite rats can ever totally phase out the use of cash or coinage - and force everyone to use a special credit or debit card for every purchase that is made, then those same ruling elites can not only track your every move and know when and where you purchased a pack of chewing gum at a gas station along some back road highway - but they can also simply 'turn off' the cards for anyone they deem to be a dissident or outspoken opponent of the jewish agenda of global-wide wars and mass murder, or some white nationalist who isn't going along with the jewish white genocide via open borders agenda. So, once they deactivate your card, you will be unable to buy food, gas for your car, medicine for what ails you, or even a six-pack of beer. That's total control, friends. And, make no mistake - our hate filled, anti-white jewish enemy would like nothing more than to have that sort of power over the White race. Which we all might want to think about, as we watch what appears to be a deliberate destruction of nearly all fiat currencies. Is this part of this plan? To destroy cash completely, and force those marks of the beast upon us?

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Governments Agree: You Will Have No Electronic Privacy

“Don’t change a winning strategy.” Nowhere is this truism more slavishly followed than in the global campaign to eliminate financial and electronic privacy. The strategy is simple. First, the governments that find privacy inconvenient create a purportedly independent commission, funded by a non-governmental entity, such as the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The purpose of the commission is to find a solution to a “problem.” The problem could be the disturbing tendency of individuals to take measures so as not to have their wealth confiscated. Or, their equally disturbing desire not to have their communications monitored. http://lewrockwell.com/nestmann/nestmann33.1.html


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Yahoo Condemned Over Plans to Snoop on E-Mails on Behalf of Advertisers

Internet giant Yahoo has been condemned over plans to snoop on emails in a ‘blatant intrusion of privacy’. The U.S. company provides an email service for thousands of Britons, including children, who will assume that the system is completely private. However, it has emerged that Yahoo has changed its small print terms and conditions to get permission to view and scan emails. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2012013/Yahoo-condemned-plans-snoop-emails-behalf-advertisers.html


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Dictatorship Watch: TomTom Admits to Sending Your Routes and Speed Information to the Police

It appears every gadget in your possession is tracking your location. First it was the iPhone, then Android phones and now it’s your bleedin’ sat-nav. TomTom, perhaps in a pre-emptive strike against its own user-tracking scandal, has admitted its sat-navs can track users and inform third parties about how fast they’re going. The sat-navs in TomTom’s Live range all feature built-in 3G data cards, which feed location and route information back to a central server, which allows TomTom to create a map of congestion hotspots. It’s now emerged that this data, however, along with a user’s speed, is being made available to local governments and authorities. http://crave.cnet.co.uk/cartech/tomtom-admits-to-sending-your-routes-and-speed-information-to-the-police-50003618/


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Dictatorship Watch: iPhone Keeps Record of Everywhere You Go

Security researchers have discovered that Apple’s iPhone keeps track of where you go – and saves every detail of it to a secret file on the device which is then copied to the owner’s computer when the two are synchronised.The file contains the latitude and longitude of the phone’s recorded coordinates along with a timestamp, meaning that anyone who stole the phone or the computer could discover details about the owner’s movements using a simple program. http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2011/apr/20/iphone-tracking-prompts-privacy-fears


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Snooping: It’s Not a Crime, It’s a Feature

Cellphone users say they want more privacy, and app makers are listening. No, they’re not listening to user requests. They’re literally listening to the sounds in your office, kitchen, living room and bedroom. A new class of smartphone app has emerged that uses the microphone built into your phone as a covert listening device — a “bug,” in common parlance. But according to app makers, it’s not a bug. It’s a feature! The apps use ambient sounds to figure out what you’re paying attention to. It’s the next best thing to reading your mind. http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/print/9215853/Snooping_It_s_not_a_crime_it_s_a_feature?taxonomyName=Privacy&taxonomyId=84


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Land of the Free Watch: U.S. Police Increasingly View Private E-mail, Instant Messages

Law enforcement organizations are making tens of thousands of requests for private electronic information from companies such as Sprint, Facebook and AOL, but few detailed statistics are available, according to a privacy researcher. Police and other agencies have “enthusiastically embraced” asking for e-mail, instant messages and mobile-phone location data, but there’s no U.S. federal law that requires the reporting of requests for stored communications data. http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9215730/U.S._police_increasingly_view_private_email_instant_messages?source=CTWNLE_nlt_pm_2011-04-12


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Land of the Free Watch: Justice Department Opposes Digital Privacy Reforms

The U.S. Justice Department today offered what amounts to a frontal attack on proposals to amend federal law to better protect Americans’ privacy. http://news.cnet.com/8301-31921_3-20051461-281.html


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Keep Your Assets Hidden in Plain Sight

Sorry David Copperfield. No matter how good a magician you are, there are some assets that you can’t make vanish, and it has nothing to do with genetics. I’m talking about assets that have your name written all over them in the public record. It is hard to put real estate, vehicles, and other attention grabbing assets into a private safe somewhere. Even if you did, jealous ex boyfriends, business competitors, and shysters can still look you up and see what you have stashed away. The reason why your assets can make you so vulnerable is because the law requires that certain records be made available to the public. That includes some records with very revealing information about you and your stuff. It’s a lot like forcing you to go out in public with your fly open. Many of the websites that publish personal information, like Intelius and Lexis-Nexis, get a lot of their information from these public records. To make it harder for the curious and nefarious to tap juicy assets for personal information, you have to know where you are vulnerable. http://www.lewrockwell.com/rounds/rounds31.1.html


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Administration Readying Internet Identity Tracking System

Jan. 7 (Bloomberg) — The Obama administration plans to announce today plans for an Internet identity system that will limit fraud and streamline online transactions, leading to a surge in Web commerce, officials said.

While the White House has spearheaded development of the framework for secure online identities, the system led by the U.S. Commerce Department will be voluntary and maintained by private companies, said the officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity ahead of the announcement.

A group representing companies including Verizon Communications Inc., Google Inc., PayPal Inc., Symantec Corp. and AT&T Inc. has supported the program, called the National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace, or NSTIC.

http://www.businessweek.com/news/2011-01-07/internet-identity-system-said-readied-by-obama-administration.html


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Court Rules Mobile Phones Can Be Searched without a Warrant

The California Supreme Court ruled that police can search a suspect’s cell-phone text messages without a warrant, based on past cases where cigarette packs can be searched. A smartphone stores vast amounts of personal data, not even in the same realm as a pack of smokes. In this electronic age, the government moves America closer to a creepy police state.

More bad news on the privacy front pushes us closer to an police state in an electronic age. Monday, in a 5-2 split decision [PDF], the California Supreme Court ruled that police do not need a warrant before searching cell phone text messages of someone who has been arrested. In fact, the court determined that an arrested person has no privacy rights over any personal belongings they’re carrying on them when taken into custody. Police are allowed to seize and examine anything they find in the arrestee’s possession.

http://www.networkworld.com/community/blog/ca-court-rules-smartphones-can-be-searched-wi?source=NWWNLE_nlt_daily_am_2011


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Monitoring America: The Government’s Development Of A Vast Panopticon Spy Network

Over the years we have seen countless instances of unaccountable government and military programs that have been in operation for decades, all centered around covertly spying and gathering information on American citizens. We have extensively documented such programs from COINTELPRO through to Operation CHAOS, the Defense Department’s Counterintelligence Field Activity and the recent NSA warrantless wiretapping. Large corporations such as Google, AT&T, Facebook and Yahoo to name but a few are also intimately involved in the overarching program. Those corporations have specific government arms that are supplying the software, hardware and tech support to US intelligence agencies in the process of creating a vast closed source database for global spy networks to share information. We are now witnessing the coordination and mass consolidation of scores of these operations into one all encompassing panopticon program. http://www.infowars.com/monitoring-america-the-governments-development-of-a-vast-panopticon-spy-network/


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Federal Court Blocks Obama Administration Attempt to Spy on Cell Phones Without a Warrant

The Obama Administration’s effort to obtain your location from cell phone towers without a warrant was rebuffed Wednesday by a federal court. The 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Wednesday that the Justice Department cannot obtain information about which cell phone towers mobile phones communicate with without a warrant. The decision was first reported by Wired’s David Kravets, and has received almost no coverage in the press. The Obama Administration is seeking to reverse an earlier ruling giving judges the authority to require a warrant for the government to obtain cell phone tracking data. http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2010/12/obama-attempt-spy-cell-phones-overturned-federal-court/


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Land of the Free Watch: Homeland Security ‘Messages’ Coming to Walmart, Hotels, Malls

Shoppers at Walmart will soon have something other than glossy magazines and chewing gum to look at when in the checkout line: A “video message” from the Department of Homeland Security asking them to look out for “suspicious” activity and report it immediately.
It’s part of a new Department of Homeland Security program that could see Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano’s face on video screens in malls, retail outlets and hotels across the United States. http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article27026.htm


COMMENTS:


TheSouthernNationalist

It's stuff like this that makes me not want to go to walmart. As a concealed carry permit holder, I can just imagine what would happen if I was leaning over to look at an item while in the store and my pistol was seen as my jacket was opened slightly, oh God imagine the calls that would be made! Probably have the swat 'em team slam me on the ground, get labeled as a terrorist, and sent off to jail!

Scott Banks

Report that you didn't see one single product at Walmart that wasn't made in China. Suggest that you suspect Walmart might be Chinese communist front company.

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TSA-Style Pat Downs Hit The Streets

As we have repeatedly warned, everything unfolding in the airports, from naked radiation body scanners to pat downs, is now being implemented on mass transit as well as every major street corner in America. Constitutional protections of privacy and immunity from unreasonable search and seizure have been abolished, replaced with guilty until proven innocent. http://www.prisonplanet.com/tsa-style-pat-downs-hit-the-streets.html


COMMENTS:


Jean

As I have been saying for years "We are ALL Palestinians NOW!"

Reinhardt

Not just in Philly folks! Also in cities in the southwest, but seems to be restricted to bad ass white folks!

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The United States of Fear

It’s finally coming into focus, and it’s not even a difficult equation to grasp. It goes like this: take a country in the grips of an expanding national security state and sooner or later your “safety” will mean your humiliation, your degradation. And by the way, it will mean the degradation of your country, too. http://www.lewrockwell.com/engelhardt/engelhardt411.html


COMMENTS:


Doc Holliday

degredation schmegredation just so long as no negro sporting events or oprah are interferred with. life is good.

Conrad

A people that gives up liberty (or dignity) for security deserve neither.

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The Generational Privacy Divide

Last week hundreds of privacy regulators, corporate officers and activists gathered in Jerusalem, Israel for the annual Data Protection and Privacy Commissioner Conference. The conference theme focused on the perception of a growing privacy divide between generations, with older and younger demographics seemingly adopting sharply different views on the importance of privacy.

Many acknowledged that longstanding privacy norms are being increasingly challenged by the massive popularity of social networks that encourage users to share information that in a previous generation would have never been made publicly available for all the world to see. Moreover, rapid technological change and the continuous evolution of online sites and services create enormous difficulty for regulators unaccustomed to moving at Internet speed.

http://thetyee.ca/Mediacheck/2010/11/02/GenerationalPrivacyDivide/


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